Cogeneration

  • Cogeneration is an energy conversion technology consisting of the sequential and simultaneous production of electricity and useful heat, both from a single source of fuel.
  • In conventional power generation, some energy must be rejected as waste heat, but in cogeneration a big portion of this thermal energy is used to produce steam, chilled water, hot air or other useful forms of thermal energy.
  • Cogeneration plants can have thermal efficiencies of 85% or higher, while conventional, separate energy generation plants have efficiencies around 58%.
  • The energy33 team has developed more than 500MW of cogeneration projects with various fuels.

Among the different cogeneration configurations, the following are the most relevant:

  • Natural gas, LNG, flared gas or other type of gas fuel fired cogeneration plants to produce electricity, steam and/or chilled water, designed around gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators (HRSG), configured in simple cycle (no steam turbine included) or combined cycle (steam turbine is included).
  • Biomass fired cogeneration plants to produce electricity, steam and/or chilled water, designed around steam boilers and turbines, configured in simple cycle or designed around an Organic Rankine Cycle configuration.